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  1. Conditions
  2. PCOS

What is PCOS?

PCOS is a common hormonal disorder that affects 1 in 10 women. It affects how the ovaries work and disrupts hormonal balance in the body. The exact cause of PCOS is still unknown. The main features of PCOS include absent or reduced ovulation, high levels of androgens (like testosterone) and polycystic ovaries.

What type of PCOS do you have?

Did you know that there are different types of PCOS? PCOS can present itself in a number of ways, with a range of different symptoms. There are three main features of PCOS. If you have at least two of these features, you may be diagnosed with PCOS. We've summarised this in the drop-downs below, with information about whether or not the Béa Treatment might be suitable.

Features

Androgens, like testosterone, may cause excess hair on the body or face, acne or weight gain. Everyone responds differently so you may not have all of these symptoms but recognise one or two.

Is the Béa Treatment suitable?

The Béa Treatment is suitable if you have high levels of androgens - if you know you're ovulating.

Features

Weight gain (unintended), excessive tiredness, recurrent infections.

Is the Béa Treatment suitable?

The Béa Treatment might be suitable if you have elevated insulin or glucose - if you know you're ovulating.

Features

Enlarged ovaries with many fluid-filled sacs (this is seen on an ultrasound).

Is the Béa Treatment suitable?

The Béa Treatment might be suitable if you have polycystic ovaries - if you know you're ovulating.

Features

Ovaries are not releasing eggs during the menstrual cycle.

Is the Béa Treatment suitable?

The Béa Treatment is not suitable for absent ovulation.

Speaking to your GP about PCOS

If you have PCOS and are having difficulty trying to conceive, it is a good idea to visit your GP. Your GP can help you optimise your health if there are any lifestyle changes you could be making or refer you for further investigations or to a specialist. NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) guidelines state that if there is a known predisposing factor for infertility (such as PCOS), then doctors should make an earlier referral for specialist consultation.If you’re not sure what to discuss with your GP - read our articleHow to speak with your doctor about fertility for support.