Béa FertilityStart Assessment

Fertility Conditions

Do you have a known cause of fertility problems?

If you’ve been trying to conceive for a while, you may have been to visit your GP to have some tests performed. Fertility tests help determine if there's an underlying cause of why you're not getting pregnant.

You may have received a diagnosis following the results of your investigations. Explore the most common fertility conditions here - and how the Béa Treatment can work with them.

Explore our guides to:

If you don't have a diagnosis

If you’ve been trying to conceive for some time, it would be a good idea to visit your GP you will carry out an assessment and perform some initial investigations. These fertility tests may help determine if there’s an underlying cause of why you’re not getting pregnant.

Your GP will ask you about your menstrual cycle, your medical history, if you take any medications, how long you've been trying to conceive and may ask specific questions about the timing of when you have sex. Most commonly, investigations will involve blood tests, an ultrasound and a semen analysis. It is really helpful if you can provide a symptom diary, allowing the GP to see if there is a correlation of symptoms and the delay in getting pregnant.

When can you see your GP?

According to the NICE guidelines, you should visit your GP if you've been trying to conceive for more than one year. You should be offered an earlier referral for specialist advice and tests if the female partner is aged 36 years old or over.

What should your symptom diary include?

You can use our symptom checklist below to help record your symptoms and to support conversations with your GP as well.

Monitor the length of your cycle, regularity, any vaginal discharge, heaviness of your period and presence of clots.

Why this is important

This can be indicative of ovulatory challenges such as PCOS, infections such as STI's or pelvic disorders like endometriosis

Tests your GP may perform

Blood tests may include:

  • P21. This test measures progesterone levels to assess if ovulation has taken place.
  • FSH (follicle stimulating hormone). This is used to give an indication of ovarian activity.
  • LH (luteinising hormone). LH should reach a peak before ovulation, but elevated LH levels can have an abnormal effect on the ovaries.
  • TFT (thyroid function test). Thyroid hormone levels can impact ovulation.
  • STI screen

In addition to blood tests, you may also have a pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound examination to assess your uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries.

Have you noticed extra hair appear on your face or body? Do you suffer from spots or acne? Do you experience hot flushes, headaches, mood swings or vaginal dryness?

Why this is important

The above symptoms can be indicative of PCOS, endometriosis, adenomyosis and in some rare cases, early menopause.

Tests your GP may perform

Blood tests may include:

  • FSH (follicle stimulating hormone). This is used to give an indication of ovarian activity.
  • LH (luteinising hormone). LH should reach a peak before ovulation, but elevated LH levels can have an abnormal effect on the ovaries.
  • TFT (thyroid function test). Thyroid hormone levels can impact ovulation.
  • Prolactin. Elevated levels of prolactin may suppress ovulation so prolactin may be checked if periods are absent.
  • In addition to blood tests, you may also have a pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound examination to assess your uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries. Sometimes you might be referred to a gynaecologist for consideration of a laparoscopy (camera test inside pelvic cavity).

Make a note of the timing and frequency of sex. Do you experience pain during intercourse? Do you bleed after sex? Do you bleed in between periods?

Why this is important

The above symptoms could be indicative of infections (for example STI's or pelvic infections) or a cervical condition (for example ectropion or a graze on the cervix). Pain during intercourse could be related to physical or psychological causes, including endometriosis and vaginismus.

Tests your GP may perform

STI screening, ultrasound scan, vaginal swabs and possible speculum investigation to visualise the cervix. Sometimes you might be referred to a gynaecologist for consideration of a laparoscopy (camera test inside pelvic cavity).