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What should I do if I don't think I'm ovulating?

If you’ve been tracking your cycles but can’t determine if ovulation takes place, you may want to get in touch with your GP as they can help assess if there are any tests that should be done to see if there’s an underlying cause. Sometimes, reasons for not ovulating could include PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), excessive stress, thyroid conditions or an underlying infection.

 

Monitor the following and bring notes to your GP for your appointment - this could help your conversation and their assessment.

 

Menstrual cycle symptoms:

Monitor the length of your cycle, regularity, any vaginal discharge, heaviness of your period and presence of clots.

Why this is important
This can be indicative of ovulatory challenges such as PCOS, infections such as STI's or pelvic disorders like endometriosis.

Tests your GP may perform
Blood tests to assess if ovulation has taken place, thyroid hormones and possible STI screen. In addition to blood tests, you may also have a pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound examination to assess your uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries.

 

General symptoms:

Have you noticed extra hair appear on your face or body? Do you suffer from spots or acne? Do you experience hot flushes, headaches, mood swings or vaginal dryness?

Why this is important
The above symptoms can be indicative of PCOS, endometriosis, adenomyosis and in some rare cases, early menopause.

Tests your GP may perform
Blood tests to assess elevated hormone levels that might impact ovulation and hair growth. In addition to blood tests, you may also have a pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound examination to assess your uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries. Sometimes you might be referred to a gynaecologist for consideration of a laparoscopy (camera test inside pelvic cavity).

 

Symptoms related to sex:

Make a note of the timing and frequency of sex. Do you experience pain during intercourse? Do you bleed after sex? Do you bleed in between periods?

Why this is important
The above symptoms could be indicative of infections (for example STI's or pelvic infections) or a cervical condition (for example ectropion or a graze on the cervix). Pain during intercourse could be related to physical or psychological causes, including endometriosis and vaginismus.

Tests your GP may perform
STI screening, ultrasound scan, vaginal swabs and possible speculum investigation to visualise the cervix. Sometimes you might be referred to a gynaecologist for consideration of a laparoscopy (camera test inside pelvic cavity).